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Gladiator
As discussed previously, the movie Gladiator was used as a tool from which to draw powerful leadership qualities. Looking further into the story line, several other lessons can be extracted. It is interesting to observe the two opposing leadership styles displayed by the two key characters, Maximus, the Roman general, and Commodus, the dark and scheming emperor.

Commodus is the supreme leader of all of Rome. He has immense power and uses his position as emperor to command and lead. People follow him for several reasons; they serve him for the potential gain they may acquire, or out of fear of retribution. The more pervasive reason the people follow Commodus is out of fear rather than loyalty. Read more


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Gladiator pic 3

A couple of nights ago, I watched one of my favorite movies for the umpteenth time and was reminded of the juicy lessons in leadership found throughout the entire movie. It was important to note, even, the depth of these lessons learned in just the first five minutes of watching. These lessons can be easily applied in the world of business and all managers/employees could benefit from the inspiration.

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We all know that success can be defined in many different ways, and that there are various methods in measuring this elusive quality. It can be realized in many forms: a student earning an ‘A’ on a test, a businesswoman achieving a comfortable salary, a father whose child is confident around other children, or by a simple nod of approval from a mentor. The perception of success is in the “eye of the beholder,” and this fact becomes self-evident as life progresses. Read more

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A win for everyone

A win for everyone

Core values represent an extraordinary level of excellence and service; especially when found in the employees of a company and therefore translates to the level of quality and service provided to the clients by the company as a whole.  Specialized and directed recruiting and training efforts are keys to establishing and fostering a work environment where core values are…well…valued.

When it comes to excellence, teamwork, dependability, integrity or professionalism It is tempting in any business model to begin cutting corners in order to save money on costs – especially when it is perceived that these cuts can be accomplished without affecting the quality of the end service or product provided to the customer.  What is often missed is the effect these cuts have on the internal morale and workings of the employees and their core values.  It is hard to feel trustworthy or a sense of integrity if your employer’s policies or procedures demand questionable or downright illegal activity. Read more


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Webster’s Dictionary defines Excellence as “the quality of being excellent,” and defines excellent as “very good: extremely good.” So, excellence in business is simply being very good at what one does. Easier said than done since “good” is a relative term and, relatively speaking, all of your competition is trying to be “good” at what you do as well. Read more

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Webster’s dictionary defines professionalism as: the skill, good judgment, and polite behavior that is expected from a person who is trained to do a job well.

Good judgment with regard to your company’s specific product or service is easy to train – good judgment in general, however, is something that it takes years to master – usually from our childhood. It is this general judgment that is fairly easy to spot, test, and interview for before offering an applicant a position with your company. Read more

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Miriam-Webster’s dictionary defines Dependability “able to be trusted to do or provide what is needed : able to be depended on”

At first blush, dependability may seem like a lesser value, but in truth it is every bit as critical and important as the rest, because in business it is dependability that determines whether your customers will return.  In the realm of employment a dependable employee is the one with the most appreciation from management and least likely to find themselves laid off or replaced. Read more


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Webster’s dictionary defines teamwork as: work done by several associates with each doing a part but all subordinating personal prominence to the efficiency of the whole.

The first place where we usually learn teamwork is when playing sports or games as children.  It doesn’t usually take long before most children realize that in a team sport, those who seek their own glory, fame and self-interests are more of a hindrance than a help.  As children grow into adulthood and enter the business world these early lessons are reinforced continually, for in business, the team that backstabs, climbs over companions, and is filled with self-interested individuals is a team that is dragging its company down.

There are very few businesses that encourage dog-eat-dog tactics among its employees.  That kind of toxic environment is best reserved for companies whose ethical concerns are minimal and whose clientele and stakeholders are absolutely concerned with profit over every other consideration. Read more

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Webster’s dictionary defines integrity as: firm adherence to a code of especially moral or artistic values. When it comes to successful business dealings, integrity is a highly sought-after, but increasingly rare commodity.

Personal Integrity
Personal Integrity involves an internal commitment to avoiding what are seen as vices in society: lying, stealing, cheating, gossiping, etc. A person with integrity does not avoid vices only when it is convenient, or when they are worried they will be caught. Someone with integrity avoids a particular vice (or all of them) at every time as a matter of personal pride and honor. Read more


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our-team-hero

The business of business lies in customer satisfaction. Without customers to sell a product or service to, no business thrives for long. Without customer satisfaction, no business keeps its customers for long.

The business of keeping customers satisfied is itself, a billion-dollar industry, as companies invest in the expertise of organizations whose sole purpose is to tell them how to appeal to their customer base and attract that ever-loyal word-of-mouth clientele. Read more